The SS in The Bulge

Garrett E Eriksen takes a look at the uniforms and insignia worn by the Waffen-SS at the Ardennes Offensive. The rest of this article can be found in the January 2018 issue of The Armourer. [This article is primarily on the uniforms and insignia of the Waffen-SS at the Ardennes Offensive, however some historical context will benefit further understanding of this important battle and the equipment … Continue reading The SS in The Bulge

RAF Memorials: what we many owe to The Few

Memorials, monuments and flights dedicated to the Royal Air Force and those who flew to defend our liberty. The rest of this article can be found in the special RAF 100 Year Anniversary Edition 2018 issue of The Armourer. They found his body washed up on the stark and stony shore of Trondheim, Norway. He was dressed in the uniform of Her Majesty’s Royal Air Force, Scottish … Continue reading RAF Memorials: what we many owe to The Few

Hysterical Accuracy: Women, WWII, and Gaming.

First, let’s answer the question: “is it historically accurate that women fought in WWII?” Short answer: yes. Now, let’s elaborate. Battlefield is a long-running gaming franchise that has roamed through several different eras of warfare including World War I and II, Vietnam, the modern era, and even the distant future. It is a series built around intense battles and action where you can hear your … Continue reading Hysterical Accuracy: Women, WWII, and Gaming.

What they wore at Stalingrad

Garrett E Eriksen examines uniforms and gear worn by the Red Army and Wehrmacht at Stalingrad. The rest of this article can be found in the December 2017 issue of The Armourer. The Battle of Stalingrad is near mythical in its status as a decisive battle during World War II. Any history buff worth their salt has, at the very least, heard of this battle if not … Continue reading What they wore at Stalingrad

The Uniforms of Dunkirk

Garrett E Eriksen examines some of the uniforms, medals and equipment of Navy and Civilian personnel deployed to the Evacuation of Dunkirk. The rest of this article can be found in the September 2017 issue of The Armourer.   The events at Dunkirk over 26 May to 4 June 1940 saw nearly 400,000 soldiers evacuated from the shores of the embattled French coastline. The desperate situation the … Continue reading The Uniforms of Dunkirk

“The WVS Never Says No”

Garrett E Eriksen examines the Women’s Voluntary Service during the London Blitz. The rest of this article can be found in the November 2017 issue of The Armourer. THE WOMEN’S VOLUNTARY SERVICE The romantic notion of warfare, until World War I, held that fighting and dying should be left to the soldiers. Civilians in towns and cities were considered non-combatants and the expectation was that they would … Continue reading “The WVS Never Says No”

VETERAN STORIES NEEDED

I am a historian who has been studying the South Africa Border War in detail for almost a decade. I am currently completing my PhD at Stellenbosch University and my topic is on what SADF soldiers did when not in combat and/or during recreation time, and specifically when deployed in Angola and on the Border between 1966 – 1989. I’m looking for stories, photos, videos, … Continue reading VETERAN STORIES NEEDED

The Atomic Bomb – From Function to Fallout

  I was invited to speak on 6 August 2017 at a special event hosted by the Congolese Civil Society at the Iziko South African Museum in Cape Town, South Africa. The conference was to be on nuclear weapons, the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the legacy of atomic weapons and how the Congo was directly involved in the acquisition of uranium for the bombs dropped … Continue reading The Atomic Bomb – From Function to Fallout

The Uniforms of the Desert

An examination of the gear worn by both Axis and Allied forces at the Siege of Tobruk. The rest of this article can be found in the April 2017 issue of The Armourer. 1941 saw the likes of General Erwin Rommel, the Desert Fox himself, testing the might of his Afrika Korps against the steely resolve of the British Western Desert Force (WDF) in Northern Africa. … Continue reading The Uniforms of the Desert

The South African Border War – A Brief History

“A country without a memory is a country of madmen.”  –George Santayana South Africa had humble beginnings as a refreshment station, founded by Jan van Riebeeck in 1652 in the Cape of Good Hope on behalf of the Dutch East India Company. The refreshment station would later grow to become Cape Town, the country’s current legislative capital.[1] In 1806, the Cape Colony was seized by … Continue reading The South African Border War – A Brief History